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Update on the Ban of Single-Use Plastics

Updated: Oct 18, 2018



Single-use plastics are the hot topic in the news currently. About a month ago, we wrote a post about the plastic straws debate, but as the world continues to tackle the tough issue of single-use plastics, here is an update of exactly what progress is being made.


Definition


What is a single-use plastic? In today’s news, single-use plastics are referring to the plastic straws, cups, plates, and utensils that are being thrown out after just one use.


Why the Fuss?


Single-use plastics are especially bad for the environment because they are produced in such a high quantity. In fact, about 167 million tons of single-use plastics are produced each year. While countries all around the world are in a rush to cut their plastic use in any way they can, cutting or limiting single-use plastics have been the easiest place to make the cuts.


The Numbers


Currently, over sixty countries around the world are working towards banning or introducing fees for single-use plastics. However, some countries are more successful than others. India has seen a lot of success, so much so that they estimate they will be rid of all single-use plastic by 2022. However other places, like New Jersey, have met struggles with either enforcing the rules or getting the bans to pass.


Overall, this debate is far from over. More countries and governments are working towards bringing a light to this issue, and perhaps banning single-use plastics are where the end of plastic waste starts.


What do you think about the debate? If you are interested in cutting down on your use of single-use plastics, try starting small, like using reusable straws or using biodegradable utensils. Whatever changes you make, it starts with us to make a million waves!

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